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Businesses in A/NZ must work with digital disruption for success, exec says

03 Apr 17

In a new era defined by cloud computing and mobile strategies, companies are pursuing new IT tools, and the best use of tools requires a disruption to operational procedures, according to CompTIA.

That’s according to Seth Robinson, senior director, technology analysis with CompTIA.

He says that as new technologies have entered the picture, a common theme has been the blending of traditional mindsets and cutting-edge thinking.

“Standard objectives, such as enhanced efficiency, are now being mixed in with newer business goals, such as innovation and pursuit of new customers. Of course, all of these goals are now being driven and enhanced by technology,” explains Robinson.

“Unfortunately, many companies do not feel fully prepared to enter this new digital era. The situation is especially critical for some small businesses, who tend to put weight on more traditional goals and can be less confident in their technical acumen.”

Karen Drewitt, A/NZ Channel Community Chair and General Manager of The Missing Link, adds that small businesses face additional challenges with a lack of in-house resources or competing priorities.

“Running the business often takes precedence over technological change,” she says.

Key changes in the digital organisation era according to CompTIA include:

  • Digital transformation is defining the business of the future. Companies today are blending the traditional view of IT as a tactical function with the perspective of technology as a strategic driver.
  • The decision process for new technology is experiencing major disruption. Digital organisations are not just adopting new technology; they are also modifying processes to optimise available tools and models. 
  • IT professionals in digital organisations have a lot on their plate. As IT teams take on dual responsibility for tactics and strategy, they must balance four areas: infrastructure, innovation, integration, and intelligence. 
  • Business units in digital organisations still want to partner with IT. Although rogue IT has received tremendous focus in recent years, most businesses are shifting to models that keep IT in the loop. 

 “The transformation to digital organisations is well underway,” explains Robinson.

“New tools, new processes, and new duties for IT will define this revolution and shape businesses for the future.”

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