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Bridge partners with HR3 to drive employee development

10 Dec 2018

Bridge, an employee development suite, has partnered with Australian HR, payroll and WHS software provider HR3, to help their customers better manage learning and development. 

The move will see HR3 enhance its software suite with innovative learning, development and performance management solutions from Bridge, allowing their existing and new customers to harness best-of-breed software without having to worry about integration. 

Bridge helps organisations better develop employees by providing them with the tools they need to grow in their jobs, master critical skills and learn from managers and mentors. 

In a recent survey, HR3 carried out with over 1,000 of its customers, one in three (33%) respondents rated performance management as ‘very or extremely valuable’. 

The Perform module within Bridge is a continuous 1:1 performance management system that builds stronger manager-employee relationships.

As a result of this partnership, HR3’s customers now have access to turnkey solutions, from their own market leading software suite offering to the cutting-edge learning and performance management systems provided by Bridge, via a one-stop shop. 

In addition to Perform, ‘Bridge Learn’ is a learning management system focused on engaging experiences and knowledge retention that helps organisations create a strong learning culture that engages, develops and retains top talent.

“We are delighted to partner with HR3 to provide their customers with our powerful learning and performance management software,” said Steven Sutcliffe, Director of Bridge APAC. 

“More and more organisations are recognising the importance of learning and development to attract, engage and retain talent, and Bridge is a powerful employee-centric solution that is easy to use and delivers in-depth analytics and actionable insights for HR and L&D leaders and their teams.”

“Our customers are increasingly seeking to complement our market-leading software, with an integrated solution to better manage employee learning and development,” said Michael Benyon, Chief Operating Officer at HR3. 

“As a successful technology provider in the HR space, we were looking for suitable software capable of providing the best experience for our customers. Bridge’s innovative approach to learning and performance management stood out as the clear winner.”

HR3 currently serves over 1,000 customers in Australia, reaching 250,000 employees across the retail, manufacturing, transport, services and non-profit sectors.

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