Story image

Container tech is all the rage. Here's how to make the most of it

14 Apr 16

Container technology is growing in popularity as it’s lightweight and fast and can help developers keep up in today’s fast-paced software development and release environment, according to Red Hat, the open source solutions provider.

According to the company, software container infrastructure, such as Linux Containers (LXC), is fast becoming a core facilitator of the DevOps revolution and agile development in general.

An application architecture based on Linux Containers not only requires the tools to build and run containers, but also an underlying foundation that is secure, reliable, and enterprise-grade, with an established lifecycle designed to meet the ongoing requirements of an enterprise developer over the long term, says Red Hat. These requirements include mitigation of security concerns, ongoing product enhancements, proactive diagnostics, and access to support. 

Colin McCabe, Red Hat director consulting and training, says, “For all of its convenience, Linux-based container technology, and the container management tools that make use of it, such as Docker, have certain limitations and questions around things like security, content. Fortunately, many of these can be addressed with the right approach.” 

Red Hat recommends three things developers need to keep in mind when using the Linux Containers virtualisation method, and the container technology that makes use of it: 

1. Secure your containers 

In the enterprise, the security of containerised applications is primarily defined by the software running inside containers. This means that containers should be treated like any other shippable media. This often involves securing the containers using strong encryption and ensuring that access is restricted. 

Meanwhile, the underlying operating system can also provide the operational tools to detect, find and patch security vulnerabilities before they can disrupt operations. Security is always evolving, so without the ability to respond and resolve security issues efficiently, the system as a whole can be exposed beyond the single container or host being vulnerable, Red Hat says.

2. Ensure your destinations are enterprise grade 

Delivering Linux-based containers successfully generally requires both a Linux operating system for the host, and application runtimes inside containers optimised for the host operating systems. This underlying operating system supporting the containers needs to be of an enterprise grade for supportability as well as security, regardless of the destination, according to the company.

3. Don’t get caught out 

Containers offer a great deal of flexibility, but it’s important to choose a completely open view of deployment options. Developers should try not to get caught up in a proprietary destination or toolset, otherwise you may find your containers locked out of future destinations. 
At the same time, it is important to make sure the infrastructure used is issued by a vendor that will support and provide updates, such as security patches, and make sure that container-to-host operating system compatibility is maintained, says Red Hat.

Dimension Data nabs three Cisco partner awards
Cisco announced the awards, including APJ Partner of the Year, at a global awards reception during its annual partner conference.
WatchGuard’s eight (terrifying) 2019 security predictions
The next evolution of ransomware, escalating nation-state attacks, biometric hacking, Wi-Fi protocol security, and Die Hard fiction becomes reality.
Why the adoption of SAP is growing among SMEs
Small and medium scale enterprises are emerging as lucrative end users for SAP.
Exclusive: How the separation of Amazon and AWS could affect the cloud market
"Amazon Web Services is one of the rare companies that can be a market leader but remain ruthlessly innovative and agile."
HPE extends cloud-based AI tool InfoSight to servers
HPE asserts it is a big deal as the system can drive down operating costs, plug disruptive performance gaps, and free up time to allow IT staff to innovate.
Digital Realty opens new AU data centre – and announces another one
On the day that Digital Realty cut the ribbon for its new Sydney data centre, it revealed that it will soon begin developing another one.
A roadmap to AI project success
Five keys preparation tasks, and eight implementation elements to keep in mind when developing and implementing an AI service.
The future of privacy: What comes after VPNs?
"75% of VPN users said they are seeking a better solution for cloud networks."