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Loki registers as the first Australian not-for-profit privacy firm

04 Apr 2019

Privacy network Loki claims it is now Australia’s first privacy software not-for-profit organisation – and the timing couldn’t be better as the country grapples with new encryption laws and new ways to secure privacy rights.

The Loki Foundation operates a privacy network that it describes as a network that allows users to transact and communicate privately and anonymously over the internet. It also includes a platform where users can build applications, such as messaging services, marketplaces, and social media platforms.

Now the company has registered as the LAG Foundation with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC), with the intention of supporting the development of privacy technologies. It also aims to educate everyday Australians about ways that they can have better control of their data.

'The internet is perpetually swamped by security and privacy challenges,” says Loki cofounder and project lead, Simon Harman.

“We hope to make a difference by advancing decentralised privacy and security tools for the general public to access. With the ACNC's governance standards as a benchmark, we look forward to championing greater security and privacy online in Australia with stronger accountability and support from the Loki community and beyond.''

The Loki Foundation will also use blockchain to support a developer community that will build a suite of software and online applications that enhance digital privacy.

Among them is a secure and anonymous decentralised private messenger, a new type of onion routing network to protect internet traffic, and a range of SNApps, or Service

Node Applications which will be the third party developed privacy-centric apps on its network. The Loki network will facilitate anonymous browsing, transactions and communications online, at a time where privacy remains a constant concern.

''The recently passed Assistance and Access Bill 2018 demonstrates that Australians must look to new technologies to secure their digital rights to privacy and raise the cybersecurity standards for the next generation,” comments Digital Rights Watch Australia chairman Tim Norton. 

“As the community of privacy technologists continues to grow and innovate, Australia and the world can look forward to a new wave of networks and tools that will protect basic rights to privacy and build a more secure future for all.''

Loki is based in Melbourne.

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