Story image

New report asks: How should the Australian Govt approach open data?

16 May 17

How should Australian government organisations applying open data initiatives to support information sharing? That is the main question put forward by a number of NSW agencies in a new report.

The research report, titled Conditions Enabling Open Data and Promoting a Data Sharing Culture 2017, looks at how five international jurisdictions — New Zealand, the UK, US, France and Canada  — are using open data. 

“The first of its kind in Australia, the research demonstrates how Open Data is being achieved internationally through an examination of leading jurisdictions. The research acknowledges NSW’s progress and, importantly, offers new and significant insights to inform our approach to opening up valuable NSW data resources,” explains Elizabeth Tydd, NSW Information Commissioner, CEO of the Information and Privacy Commission NSW (IPC).

She believes that opening up data is both a contemporary and useful way to open up government, provides better accountability and encourages meaningful public participation.

“In practice the research has highlighted how diverse, inter-connected and context-specific each country’s approach has been. In particular, it is clear that precisely because of the breadth of action some leading countries have taken it is difficult to isolate the particular contribution of any one element. However, the existing legislative and policy settings have informed advances in Open Data in the jurisdictions examined,” the report says.

The report, commissioned by the IPS and conducted by a team of experts from the University of New South Wales, identified six ‘enablers’ that are actively being used in open data countries.

Those enablers include leadership; legislation; policy; regulatory; culture and collaboration; and operational enablers. 

“The research builds on a recent IPC community attitudes survey which found strong support for Open Data in NSW: 83 per cent of respondents agreed that de-identified information should be used to inform the planning and delivery of government services and enhance collaboration with the public in the development of government policies,” Tydd says.

The report also suggests that New South Wales could take on practical aspects such as: 

  • Adopting the International Open Data Charter
  • Improving collaboration with the broader community, much like New Zealand’s ‘Social License’ initiative
  • Taking an anticipatory approach to regulation to ensure privacy is maintained
  • Publishing a complete catalogue of all datasets, including restricted datasets

The report was a collaborative effort between IPC, the Data Analytics Centre, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Data61, the Department of Finance, Services and Innovation and the Department of Justice.

APAC FinTech network launches to encourage cross-border innovation
Nine associations formally launched the network by signing a Statement of Intent at the Asian Financial Forum event in Hong Kong.
New blockchain solution aims to keep our food ethical
OpenSC enables anyone to scan product QR codes which automatically takes them to information about where a specific product’s journey.
Avaya expands AI offerings with new partnerships
The additions to the ecosystem will enable Avaya to add prioritisation and natural language processing to its UC solutions.
Hillstone CTO's 2019 security predictions
Hillstone Networks CTO Tim Liu shares what key developments could be expected in the areas of security compliance, cloud, security, AI and IoT.
Can it be trusted? Huawei’s founder speaks out
Ren Zhengfei spoke candidly in a recent media roundtable about security, 5G, his daughter’s detainment, the USA, and the West’s perception of Huawei.
SUSE partners with Intel and SAP to accelerate IT transformation
SUSE announced support for Intel Optane DC persistent memory with SAP HANA.
Oracle Java Card update boosts security for IoT devices
"Java Card 3.1 is very significant to the Internet of Things, bringing interoperability, security and flexibility to a fast-growing market currently lacking high-security and flexible edge security solutions."
Office workers frustrated by poor information management systems
82% of workers believe poor information management is damaging their productivity in the workplace.