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Smart Cities Council A/NZ releases new development code

31 Oct 18

The Smart Cities Council and Green Building Council of Australia have released a new standard of practice designed to ensure smart cities are built in ways that are sustainable and deliver numerous benefits to citizens.

The Code for Smart Communities is a new benchmark for urban development practices across urban regeneration precincts, greenfield communities and institutional campuses.

The Code addresses issues including telecommunications connectivity, data insights, digital planning practices and innovation districts.

Smart Cities Council Australia and New Zealand executive director Adam Beck says the Code is an important milestone.

“This is the first time a smart community has been defined in a way that can be practically applied. We went back to principles to build this Code from the ground up,” he explains.

The code took into account feedback and engagement from the development industry, technology companies, city shapers, and all tiers of government.

Green Building Council of Australia chief executive officer Romilly Madew says that when the code was being developed, there was synergy between a number of different areas.

“There was a strong synergy between the sustainable development outcomes articulated in the Green Star – Communities rating tool and the enabling opportunities from technology and data to enhance community outcomes”. 

“This work will provide us with the opportunity to ensure smart cities principles are embedded in Green Star as the rating system evolves to meet industry and global trends, and continues to deliver environmental efficiencies, productivity gains and health and wellbeing outcomes in our buildings and communities,” Madew continues.

Beck says two projects have already stepped up to be the first to embrace the Code’s principles.

- Yarrabilba, a Lendlease community in Queensland, set to be home to more than 40,000 residents

- Sydney Olympic Park, planned to grow into a 23,000-person community with more than 30,000 jobs.

Lendlease was a major supporter of the Code’s development. Managing director of Landlease’s Communities business, Matt Wallace, says customers expect more connectivity than ever.

“Our customers are expecting more seamless connectivity in all aspects of their lives from high-speed broadband at home to free Wi-Fi in the park. Our Smart Community flagship, Yarrabilba, has provided us with a platform to test and evolve a range of technologies to optimise people’s lives to create healthier, safer and more sustainable communities. We look forward to working closely with Smart Cities Council to test the code at Yarrabilba and provide feedback to enhance its development.”

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