Story image

Fujitsu tech stores data locally at each location, not in the cloud

06 Sep 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories has expanded its Creative Digital Space User-Interface (UI) technology.

Initially developed in 2015, this technology streamlines the sharing of information amongst geographically dispersed workers, enabling collaboration through connecting multiple large screens and other devices in a single location.

The Japanese ICT company draws attention to issues that arise when sharing data between multiple locations which is stored in the cloud.

In some cases, only one location can operate a PC at a time, and in other cases, information is not able to be accessed concurrently. Likewise, there are coordination technologies that allow documents in the cloud to be simultaneously edited from multiple locations, however, the user experience of the system can be dictated by external network lag.  

What Fujitsu is setting out to do is make this experience of sharing and using the same data between different locations as smooth and seamless as possible.

To do this, Fujitsu Laboratories has developed distributed data sharing technology which stores data locally at each location, rather than in the cloud.

This technology synchronises only the necessary data while eliminating unnecessary data, such as the path of something as it is moved around a screen, depending on network latency between each location.

In addition, Fujitsu Laboratories has released new awareness propagation technology which lets users know the operational status of distant users.

This technology notifies remote users when something has been added or changed in another location, such as making objects other users are interacting with flash, and displaying a shadow representing the other user's position.

This allows users to notice when other users are in the process of adding or changing content so that they do not interfere with the process, reducing conflicts in operation.

Both of these new solutions are a part of the company’s mission to create a more expansive digital world where co-creation spaces can expand beyond office walls via networks or the internet.

For example, with these technologies, users on the manufacturing front lines can connect with their colleagues in design locations and even overseas manufacturing bases.

Additionally, in educational contexts, these technologies can create new styles of lessons, such as remote active learning through exchanges between schools.

Fujitsu Laboratories will deploy these technologies internally, conducting a series of field trials on their effectiveness in supporting idea generation, with the goal of commercialising them in fiscal 2018.

Microsoft urges organisations to tackle data blindspots
Despite significant focus placed on CX transformation, over a third of Australian organisations claimed that more than one in five of their projects failed.
Raising the stakes: McAfee’s predictions for cybersecurity
Security teams and solutions will have to contend with synergistic threats, increasingly backed by artificial intelligence to avoid detection.
Renesas develops 28nm MCU with virtualisation-assisted functions
The MCU features four 600 megahertz CPUs with a lock-step mechanism and a large 16 MB flash memory capacity.
DOCOMO ranked world's top mobile operator in 5G SEP applications
NTT DOCOMO has been ranked the world's leading mobile operator in terms of applications for candidate standard-essential patents.
Exclusive: Ping Identity on security risk mitigation
“Effective security controls are measured and defined by the direct mitigation of inherent and residual risk.”
CylancePROTECT now available on AWS Marketplace
Customers now have access to CylancePROTECT for AI-driven protection across all Windows, Mac, and Linux (including Amazon Linux) instances.
Gartner’s top 10 data and analytics trends for 2019
Data is the fuel for the modern world, and analytics the engine. Gartner has compiled the top 10 trends to watch this year.
How CIOs can work with colleagues to drive new competitive advantages
"If recent history has taught us anything, it’s that the role of the CIO is always changing, and that it won’t stop changing anytime soon."