Story image

Intel drafts model legislation to spur data privacy discussion

09 Nov 2018

Intel Corporation released model legislation designed to inform policymakers and spur discussion on personal data privacy. 

Prompted by the rapid rise of new technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), Intel’s model bill is open for review and comment from privacy experts and the public on an interactive website. 

The bill’s language and comments received should provide useful insight for those interested in meaningful data privacy legislation.

Why privacy is important: 

Data are the lifeblood for many critical new industries, including precision medicine, automated driving, workplace safety, smart cities and others. But the growing amount of personal data collected, sometimes without consumers’ awareness, raises serious privacy concerns.

People need assurances that information that is shared – both knowingly and unknowingly – will be used in beneficial, responsible ways and that they will be appropriately protected. The U.S. needs a comprehensive federal law to create the framework in which companies can demonstrate responsible behaviour.

How it works: 

Intel’s model data privacy bill aims to bring together policymakers and others in a transparent and open process that helps drive the development of actual data privacy legislation. Intel has launched a website where interested parties can review and comment on the model bill. 

More context: 

Privacy is an important and ongoing issue in our data-centric world. In a white paper published last month, Intel’s Global Privacy team laid out six policy principles for safety and privacy in the age of AI, one of the technical domains that have significant privacy implications.

These principles summarised here were among the factors that influenced Intel’s draft legislation:

  • New legislative and regulatory initiatives should be comprehensive, technology neutral and support the free flow of data.
  • Organisations should embrace risk-based accountability approaches, putting in place technical or organisational measures to minimise privacy risks in AI.
  • Automated decision-making should be fostered while augmenting it with safeguards to protect individuals.
  • Governments should promote access to data, supporting the creation of reliable data sets available to all, fostering incentives for data sharing, and promoting cultural diversity in data sets.
CrowdStrike: Improving network security with cloud computing solutions
Australian spending on public cloud services is expected to reach $6.5 billion this year according to Gartner
Intel releases 8th gen vPro mobile processors
This generation promises longer battery life, better performance, and comes with a built-in hardware security solution, Intel Hardware Shield.
Unisys encourages financial institutions to adopt open banking
“It establishes the bank as an integral part of the customers’ life – a ‘one-stop-shop’ where they can get personalised products and services they want, when they want them.”
Developers use Intel AI to solve some of the world’s biggest challenges
Risab Biswas developed a computer vision application to help farmers more easily detect pathological disease in their plants.
Smarter cities through cross-border and G2G collaborations
"As countries race ahead in their bid to accelerate smart city development through industrialisation, the environment and ultimately humanity is paying the price for this phenomenon."
SingularityNET CEO discusses the future of AI
"In my view, AI will eliminate essentially all need for humans to do practical work."
You're invited: Adobe Symposium 2019, Sydney
The event will bring together 4000 business leaders, marketers, IT and digital experts, as well as creative professionals to Sydney’s International Convention Centre in the heart of the city.
How the 5G Telco market is transforming
"Over the past six months, more people in the general populace have begun using the term 5G in their regular conversations."