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LinkedIn’s 2017 Global Top Companies list - did you make the cut?

19 Jun 2017

LinkedIn has released their 2017 Global Top Companies list which compiles 25 companies from around the world.

The list is compiled by analysing the actions taken by LinkedIn’s 500-plus million members to come up with a blended score derived from a combination of LinkedIn data and editorial coverage.

The list is based on the actions of job seekers and professionals with editorial oversight, with the aim of highlighting the companies that attract and retain top talent globally.

The top 25 companies are judged in three main areas: job seeker interest in a company's jobs, user interest in a company's brand and employees, and employee retention.

Schneider Electric, a global organisation that specialises in energy management and automation, is one of the companies that made the list. Up 7 places from last year, Schneider Electric is ranked #23 on the list.

“We are proud to be recognised by LinkedIn members for the second year in a row. In our ever-changing business landscape, we are very aware that people identify themselves with opportunities where they can bring their authentic selves to work and realise their ambitions,” says Olivier Blum, chief human resources officer and executive vice-president at Schneider Electric.

“As the energy management and automation specialist, Schneider Electric is committed to reshape industries, transform cities and enrich lives. All of which begins with the combined talent of our 144,000 employees,” Blum adds.

LinkedIn’s full 2017 Global Top Companies list is:

  1. Alphabet, IT and services
  2. Amazon, Internet
  3. Facebook, Internet
  4. Uber, Internet
  5. Apple, consumer electronics
  6. Salesforce, Internet
  7. McKinsey & Company, marketing consulting
  8. LVMH, luxury goods & jewellery
  9. L’Oreal, Cosmetics
  10. Dell Technologies, IT and service
  11. Cisco, computer networking
  12. Tesla, automotive
  13. Oracle, IT and services
  14. Siemens, electronic manufacturing
  15. Unilever, consumer goods
  16. The Walt Disney Company, entertainment
  17. Johnson & Johnson, hospital & healthcare
  18. IBM, IT & services
  19. Deloitte, management consulting
  20. PepsiCo, food & beverages
  21. Accenture, IT & services
  22. EY, accounting
  23. Schneider Electric, electronic manufacturing
  24. Adobe, computer software
  25. GE, electronic manufacturing
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