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New Sony A/NZ solution built for today's bring-your-own-device workplace

29 Aug 17

Sony A/NZ has introduced Vision Exchange, a new solution for meetings and learning environments that is both flexible and cost-effective.

Vision Exchange aims to empower flexible working amongst remote workers, and corporate employees, and it’s also suitable for education, bringing together students, lecturers, and presenters in a workgroup-based environment.

Ideal for corporate conference rooms as well as universities and colleges of higher education, Vision Exchange allows teams to brainstorm and work collaboratively through wireless sharing content from laptops and tablets.

New meeting participants can be brought in mid-meeting by adding a video connection to remote locations.

Moreover, Vision Exchange function is enhanced with the following paid licenses:

Remote Communication (PEQA-C20)

Remote Communication lets workgroups connect with other sites using standards-based video conference systems such as Sony’s SRG-120DU PTZ camera and PCS-A1 microphone.

Participants can share content from their own devices, including images, annotations overlaid on images or whiteboard description in real-time.

Streaming Output (PEQA-C30)

Utilising a separate recording server, Vision Exchange together with a PEQA-C30 license allow users to stream the meeting and lecture content displayed on the main shared screen to another location or devices using either multicast or unicast with RTP (H.264/AAC).

This allows the session to be recorded for future distribution or archiving purposes.

Active Learning (PEQA-C10)

“There are other collaborative tools out there, reflecting a major shift from passive to active learning that’s become increasingly prevalent over the last decade”, comments Brad Hanrahan, Group Manager, B&I Sony Professional Solutions A/NZ.

“But until now this fast-growing market hasn’t been offered a workgroup-focused solution for today’s BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) environments with the power, flexibility and intuitive appeal of Vision Exchange.”

Vision Exchange with Active Learning license utilises a simple Pod PC structure and Sony’s Pod PC software (PES-C10). According to Sony A/NZ, it’s easy to configure, scalable, and capable of supporting up to 10 groups of BYOD.

With the available mirroring function, each student can easily show what they have worked on and findings from other sources

Facilitators or lecturers acting as administrator of the system, can easily share materials to all screens. They are also capable of monitoring each group’s progress and quickly provide assistance while moving around the room.

Further, they can select any group’s presentation to display on either the main shared screen or the Pod screens of all groups for review or discussion alongside annotation function.

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